mySentry For Grown-Ups

mySentry For Grown-Ups | The LOOP Blog

A few months ago I had two lows in the middle of the night which resulted in 6 Starbursts and 2 protein bar wrappers thrown on the floor next to my bed. The next morning my mom saw the wrappers and immediately told me how guilty she felt for not catching them. That day she cried, and she cried hard, over the fact that even though it’s been 10 years and I’ve moved from a child with diabetes to a 20-something adult with diabetes, it is still hard for her to watch my struggle and to feel helpless during these times.

It was at that point that I decided that once mySentry became available, I would buy one. Not only for me (although I knew the real benefit would be for me) but it would be a gift for my parents. Because although they have never been the type to wake me up every night as a routine for a middle of the night blood check (maybe because I was diagnosed at the age of 12), they shouldn’t have to have worried sleepless nights or feel guilty any longer. And after only a few weeks with the mySentry, my mom has already caught a few highs and lows (the first time she caught a low we cheered, which was strange but funny all at the same time).

In the short time that I’ve had it, here are a few tips I have learned:

  • When you set it up, don’t forget to link your pump to your outpost— like I did! You have to link your monitor to your pump AND your monitor to the outpost.
  • Experiment with the settings to see what works best, like changing the lighting or the volume. Since I’m an adult and have done most of diabetes management on my own for years, we have decided to turn it on silent so my parents can just roll over and look at the screen instead of feeling like they have to always come downstairs just to check on me. But we also decided that on the days where I know I might have issues, we will turn up the volume.
  • If you would like to, you can turn it off during the day when you aren’t home so it isn’t still trying to communicate with your pump. Just unplug the power supply chord from the back of the monitor (you don’t have to unplug it from the wall).
  • It doesn’t matter what your age is, both the person wearing the pump and the person viewing the monitor should discuss what different things mean that may appear on the screen…not as they are happening at 3AM because that can be annoying, but beforehand! We went through the user guide together, and I gave a reminder crash course on what pump and sensor alerts mean (like Meter BG Now or how many units you need in your reservoir to last through the night).

I am excited to see how mySentry will continue to bring value to my life and my family’s life. There is no reason you have to manage your diabetes solely on your own, and this product has reminded me of that.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

The real-time glucose values provided by the mySentry monitor, as received from the Paradigm REAL-Time Revel insulin pump, are not intended to be used directly for making therapy adjustments. Rather, they provide an indication that may require a confirmation fingerstick measurement. All therapy adjustments should be based on measurements obtained using a blood glucose meter and not based on the value displayed by the monitor or Paradigm REAL-Time Revel insulin pump.

Once you turn off an alarm on the mySentry monitor, you need to attend to the alarm on the pump itself. You cannot respond to pump alarms directly through the mySentry monitor.

Failure to monitor your blood glucose independently of the real-time glucose values provided by the mySentry monitor, as received from the Paradigm REAL-Time Revel insulin pump, may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia and significant physical injury, including death.

Transmission of all data or alarms cannot be guaranteed with the mySentry system.Please visit www.medtronicdiabetes.com/about/safety.html for complete details.

Please visit MedtronicDiabetes.com/isi for complete safety information.

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