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Q&A with Global Hero Lindsay Gossack

By Karrie Hawbaker

Public Relations Manager

Posted:  9/22/2011 12:00 AM

Tags:

Last time, we heard from Lindsey Burch about her participating in the upcoming Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. Today, we hear from another Global HeroLindsay Gossack from Seattle, Washington.  We know Lindsay has done a lot of prep for this race and wish her the best! From everyone at The LOOP, all the best to you on race day Lindsay!

1.    Can you tell us about when you were diagnosed with diabetes?


A: I was a senior in high school – about a month away from graduating and 2 weeks away from deciding where I was going to college. I had been running on my cross-country team earlier in the school year, but stopped in February because I came down with strep throat. I started drinking a lot of water and just attributed it to having strep and the side affects from the antibiotics. I had also lost about 20 pounds and thought that was odd since I’m not genetically prone to lose weight that easily. My mom, having mother’s intuition, thought I might have diabetes. We ended up going to visit my grandfather, who has Type 2 diabetes and I tested my blood sugar using his glucose meter. The reading that came out on the screen said ‘High’ - from there my mom took me to the hospital.

It was a complete shock to me. I had lived 17 years of my life without having to worry about checking my blood glucose or having food/insulin on hand for low and high blood glucose. I ended up deciding to go to a different college since it was important to me to have family close by in case of an emergency.

2.    When did you start to use an insulin pump?


A: I started on an insulin pump about 2 years after I was diagnosed. It’s been almost three years now that I have been using a pump. I was having a lot of highs and lows on MDI. I also wanted to get back into running and thought the pump’s more precise delivery of insulin might help me in gaining the glucose control I needed. Long acting insulin made it difficult to plan work-outs, especially since I was in college. When I did get a chance to exercise, my BG would drop 100 points within the first 10-15 minutes of my workout! After starting on the pump, I started running again within a few months and thankfully my low BGs were significantly reduced.

3.    How long have you been a runner?


A: I started running cross country as a junior/senior in high school. In my junior year of college I started upping how many miles I would run. By the end of my junior year, my “just for fun runs” were about 13 miles.  The fall of my senior year of college I ran my first marathon! And my second marathon was just one month after I graduated. Overall, I have competed in marathons, half-marathons and smaller races too. For the Medtronic Twin Cities weekend, I will be competing in the 10 mile race.

4.    How are you preparing for the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon?


A:
I’m doing typical training like any other athlete would, but I make sure to lower my basal rate on my pump and carry food with me when I run. I also vary my training with long runs, short runs, speed work, and hill runs. As for my pump, I clip it to my shorts, but if I do longer runs (more than 4 miles) I use a small camelbak to keep my meter and quick sugar supply.

5.    What made you apply to be a Global Hero?


A: I heard about the program before and thought it would be really cool to see other people come together with their medical devices. When I was first diagnosed, there wasn’t a big D community in Great Falls, Montana, which is where I grew up.  Finding that community online has been so nice!

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

- Medtronic Diabetes insulin infusion pumps, continuous glucose monitoring systems and associated components are limited to sale by or on the order of a physician and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional familiar with the risks associated with the use of these systems.
- Successful operation of the insulin infusion pumps and/or continuous glucose monitoring systems requires adequate vision and hearing to recognize alerts and alarms.

Medtronic Diabetes Insulin Infusion Pumps
- Insulin pump therapy is not recommended for individuals who are unable or unwilling to perform a minimum of four blood glucose tests per day.
- Insulin pumps use rapid-acting insulin. If your insulin delivery is interrupted for any reason, you must be prepared to replace the missed insulin immediately.

Medtronic Diabetes Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Systems

- The information provided by CGM systems is intended to supplement, not replace, blood glucose information obtained using a home glucose meter. A confirmatory fingerstick is required prior to treatment.
- Insertion of a glucose sensor may cause bleeding or irritation at the insertion site. Consult a physician immediately if you experience significant pain or if you suspect that the site is infected.

Please visit www.medtronicdiabetes.com/about/safety.html for complete safety information.

Comments

John Kirk

Posted on Fri May 25 15:30:03 GMT 2012

I am a runner, too, and recently started using an insulin pump, as well as a continuous glucose monitor. In the short amount of time that I've been using the pair, I have found no use for either one, even though they say to keep them connected even during long runs. I have lived with Type 1 for 10 years, now, and have run marathons before, and since, my diagnosis. Through much trial and error, I have found that I need to stop every 3 miles to check my BG, and usually need some form of carbs. I usually try to start out a long run with BG over 200, since by the 3 mile point, my BG falls to around 100. I can keep it there for the rest of my long runs, with the routine I mentioned. What I can't figure out is why to wear my pump, since I know my BG will FALL, so the additional insulin would actually hurt me. And don't get me started about the CGM, since it's usually 50-80 units higher than what I actually measure with a finger prick at 3 miles!

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